Drug and alcohol treatment is a significant portion of all healthcare spending.
True
False
Most addicts require inpatient treatment.
True
False
Treatment isn’t usually successful for those with a serious addiction.
True
False
Only 10% of those who need treatment for addiction to drugs or alcohol are able to get it.
True
False
Treating addiction is not like treating an upset stomach. When people try to kick addiction and fail, it is a matter of will, not a matter of medicine.
True
False
Screening and brief intervention for emergency room patients is too costly and would bankrupt most county hospitals.
True
False
Most people who use drugs are out of work or unemployable.
True
False
Your son is admitted to the hospital for the third time this year as a result of an injury caused by over consumption of alcohol. As a matter of procedure the hospital will screen him for a substance abuse problem?
True
False
Funding for substance abuse treatment in Texas has increased over time.
True
False
Stigma plays a significant role in our state’s ability to effectively deal with the public health crisis of drug and alcohol addiction.
True
False
People don’t need treatment. They can just go to AA or NA.
True
False
The addict has to want help or treatment won’t work.
True
False
A portion of the Texas state alcohol taxes go toward treatment programs.
True
False
President Trump’s Opioid Emergency Not Official
On August 10, President Trump announced that the opioid crisis was a national emergency, which was the priority recommendation in the preliminary report submitted by his Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis issued in July.  However, the president hasn’t yet signed a formal declaration and sent it to Congress. “Relevant monies won’t be released until such a thing is signed,” said Northwestern University law professor Eugene Kontorovich. A White House spokesperson did not say when a signature could be expected. “The president recently instructed his administration to take all appropriate measures to confront the opioid crisis,” the spokesperson said. “Right now, these actions are undergoing an expedited legal review. In response to the delay, Senators Durbin (IL), Brown(OH), Manchin (WV), Booker (NJ),  King (ME), Portman (OH),  Capito (WV), and  Collins (ME) urged President Trump to lift the Medicaid Institutions for Mental Disease (IMD) Exclusion for residential substance use disorder treatment as part of his opioid emergency declaration. In May, the senators introduced the bipartisan Medicaid Coverage for Addiction Recovery Expansion (Medicaid CARE) Act, which would modify the IMD Exclusion – a policy created in 1965 that limits Medicaid coverage for substance abuse treatment to facilities with less than 16 beds. The Medicaid CARE Act would expand it to 40 treatment beds. Additionally, the Medicaid CARE Act establishes a new $50 million youth inpatient addiction treatment grant program to fund facilities that provide services to underserved, at-risk Medicaid beneficiaries’ younger than 21, with an emphasis on rural communities. The bill would also increase flexibility for pregnant and postpartum women who are seeking treatment.